RogerEbert.com — How to Be Single

The ensemble rom-com “How to Be Single” manages the tricky feat of balancing bawdiness and sentimentality. It doesn’t do quite as good a job of connecting all its various story lines. But the cast is so winning, you may not mind, and there’s a moment toward the end that packs a surprising emotional wallop. My […]

RogerEbert.com — Man Up

“Man Up” is a pretty standard romantic comedy on paper, featuring all the tropes of the genre: the meet-cute, the wacky friends, the spontaneous dance routine, etc. But the charismatic Lake Bell and Simon Pegg have such sparkling chemistry, they make this predictable trip worthwhile. Bell, in Bridget Jones mode as a lonely London singleton, […]

RogerEbert.com — They Came Together

Paul Rudd and Amy Poehler star in this parody of romantic comedies and all the formulas and cliches that make them seem so interchangeable. Working with director David Wain and an impressive supporting cast of likable comic talents, they’ve essentially made a formulaic, cliched romantic comedy. It’s sadly lifeless. My RogerEbert.com review. Read the review […]

What the Flick?! — They Came Together

Alonso and I have a major disagreement with our good friend, Amy Nicholson, over whether the romantic comedy parody “They Came Together” is actually funny or not.

RogerEbert.com — Baggage Claim

“Baggage Claim” is so archaic in its depiction of feminine self-worth—and, frankly, so insulting—it’s amazing that it’s coming out in 2013, not 1963. My RogerEbert.com review. Read the review here

RogerEbert.com — Wedding Palace

“Wedding Palace” bills itself as the first Asian-American romantic comedy, but it’s chock full of all the same cliches and conventions you’d see in any film of the genre. My RogerEbert.com review. Read the review here

What the Flick?! — Don Jon

It’s gym-tan-laundry all day, baby, as we review Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s directing debut “Don Jon.”

What the Flick?! — Enough Said

We all loved “Enough Said,” which features a poignant performance from the late, great James Gandolfini.