RogerEbert.com — Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer

How you feel about Norman the character will determine how you feel about “Norman” the movie. Is he a shameless hustler? Or merely an overbearing yet well-intentioned mensch? And yet, in Richard Gere’s deft, veteran hands, would-be fixer Norman Oppenheimer is consistently, completely fascinating. It’s one of the best performances of Gere’s long and eclectic […]

RogerEbert.com — Carrie Pilby

As the title character — a 19-year-old woman who’s brilliant beyond her years and miserable — Bel Powley is so enormously compelling that she breathes life into Carrie’s quirks and the story’s contrivances. It’s clear that the women behind the scenes have great affection for Carrie in all her self-sabotaging imperfections. And the supporting cast, […]

RogerEbert.com — T2 Trainspotting

If you loved “Trainspotting,” well … here it is again. Danny Boyle’s sequel to his generation-defining 1996 film offers more of the same, for better and for worse. An opportunity to wallow in grimy nostalgia seems to be its sole purpose. It’s got all of the director’s visual verve, but it lacks a real narrative […]

RogerEbert.com — A United Kingdom

For a movie about two people who loved each other so deeply, they risked losing everything to be together—their families, homes, even their countries—“A United Kingdom” plays it frustratingly safe. David Oyelowo and Rosamund Pike can do no wrong, but they can only do so much to convey passion in a film that’s well-made but […]

RogerEbert.com — Two Lovers and a Bear

“Two Lovers and a Bear” does indeed contain two lovers and a bear — and the bear can talk. The story of tortured people (Tatiana Maslany and Dane DeHaan) in a fiery romance in the icy Canadian Arctic is beautiful and strange, and it heads in directions you won’t expect. My RogerEbert.com review. Read the […]

RogerEbert.com — The Edge of Seventeen

“The Edge of Seventeen” is a strong successor to John Hughes’ legacy with its mix of biting humor and bittersweet heart. But writer-director Kelly Fremon Craig also dares to go to places that are darker and truer in her feature filmmaking debut. Hailee Steinfeld is just radiant as a high school junior whose hormones and […]

RogerEbert.com — The Girl on the Train

The book wasn’t great. It was solid trash — a juicy page turner. The movie version isn’t even that. It’s a surprisingly flat and suspense-free tale of pretty people in peril. Emily Blunt gives it her all, though, as the title character: a damaged woman on a misguided quest for redemption. My RogerEbert.com review. Read […]

RogerEbert.com — Other People

“Other People” breathes new life into the formulaic dark comedy about death. Molly Shannon will rip your heart out as a wife and mother of three who’s battling a rare form of cancer. It’s a career-changing performance in an auspicious feature debut from writer-director Chris Kelly. My RogerEbert.com review. Read the review here

RogerEbert.com — The 9th Life of Louis Drax

This is a very strange, little movie. I’m still not entirely sure how I feel about it, but I liked it a bit more than I didn’t like it, if that makes any sense. I appreciate what it’s trying to do in mixing Hitchcockian suspense with magical realism. It works, and it doesn’t. My RogerEbert.com […]

RogerEbert.com — The Innocents

Veteran French director Anne Fontaine approaches a spiritually and emotionally complex real-life slice of history with deftness and understated drama in “The Innocents,” about a group of nuns who became pregnant after Soviet soldiers raped them at the end of World War II. My RogerEbert.com review. Read the review here