Post Date Jan 16

RogerEbert.com — Paddington

Paddington Movie Review“Paddington” is smarter than the average bear. That’s right, I went there — but it’s true. It manages to pull off several different, tricky balancing acts while also serving as a stealthy allegory about immigration. Mostly, though, it’s just fun for the whole family. My review, at RogerEbert.com.

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Post Date Dec 12

RogerEbert.com — Exodus: Gods and Kings

Exodus: Gods and Kings Movie ReviewRidley Scott’s biblical epic “Exodus: Gods and Kings” is a numbing, soulless spectacle of 3-D CGI run amok. The plagues are fun, though. My RogerEbert.com review.

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Post Date Dec 5

RogerEbert.com — Still Alice

Still Alice Movie ReviewJulianne Moore gives a graceful yet powerful performance as a brilliant linguistics professor suffering from early-onset Alzheimer’s disease in “Still Alice.” The movie itself, however, isn’t all that great. My mixed RogerEbert.com review.

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Post Date Nov 27

RogerEbert.com — Penguins of Madagascar

Penguins of Madagascar Movie Review“Penguins of Madagascar,” a spin-off from the “Madagascar” franchise, is zippy and zany and much funnier than you might expect. I laughed the whole way through — because the vast majority of the humor is for us and not our kids. Still, this animated comedy is super family-friendly. My RogerEbert.com review.

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Post Date Nov 21

RogerEbert.com — The King and the Mockingbird

The King and the Mockingbird Movie ReviewThis beautiful and beautifully strange animated film, which originally was released in France in 1980, has taken a long and tortured road to reach the United States. It’s a surreal satire of the perils of tyranny, told in twisted fairy tale form. Try and find it if it comes anywhere near you. My RogerEbert.com review.

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Post Date Nov 7

RogerEbert.com — The Theory of Everything

The Theory of Everything Movie Review“The Theory of Everything” is biopic about one of the most brilliant people in the history of the planet, the renowned astrophysicist Stephen Hawking. He’s a man famous for thinking in boldly innovative ways, yet his story is told in the safest and most conventional method imaginable. Director James Marsh — an Oscar winner for the 2008 documentary “Man on Wire” — has made a strongly acted, handsomely crafted film that nonetheless feels bland and unsatisfying. My mixed RogerEbert.com review.

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Post Date Nov 7

RogerEbert.com — Actress

Actress Movie ReviewThe documentary “Actress” blurs the line between reality and performance in following its subject, former actress Brandy Burre, a mother of two trying break back into the business. Director Robert Greene takes a look at this inherently dramatic woman in ways that are both unadorned and artful. My RogerEbert.com review.

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Post Date Oct 31

RogerEbert.com — Horns

Horns Movie ReviewI love Daniel Radcliffe — he remains my favorite celebrity interview — and I love the daring choices he’s made to show his versatility outside the “Harry Potter” franchise. But I did not love the supernatural thriller “Horns,” which has some intriguing ideas but is all over the place tonally. My RogerEbert.com review.

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Post Date Oct 24

RogerEbert.com — John Wick

John Wick Movie Review“John Wick” is very much in Keanu Reeves’ wheelhouse. It’s a stylishly cool, dazzlingly choreographed action thriller that allows him to play on his stoic, Zen-like persona but also whip out a deadpan one-liner with detached precision. My RogerEbert.com review.

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Post Date Oct 17

RogerEbert.com — Birdman

Birdman Movie Review“Birdman” is technically astounding yet emotionally rich, intimate yet enormous, biting yet warm, satirical yet sweet. It’s one of the best times you’ll have at the movies all year and might just be the best movie of the year. A rare four-star review, at RogerEbert.com.

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