Post Date Dec 21

RogerEbert.com — Pitch Perfect 3

“Pitch Perfect 3” supposedly is the final film in the wildly successful series about the musical misadventures of the Barden Bellas. Lots of overlong, tearful group hugs after the final a cappella song make that clear. But we really didn’t need a second “Pitch Perfect” movie, much less a third one. Aca-nough already. My RogerEbert.com review.

Read the review here

Post Date Dec 20

Wine the Flick?! — All the Money in the World

My dear friend and What the Flick?! co-host Matt Atchity steps out from behind the camera to join me for a drink and discussion of “All the Money in the World.” Ridley Scott famously did last-minute reshoots of several scenes, replacing Kevin Spacey with Christopher Plummer — his first choice to play billionaire John Paul Getty in this real-life kidnapping drama — following a deluge of sexual misconduct accusations against Spacey. Matt and I sip and search for seams after a screening at The Grove. Enjoy!

Post Date Dec 19

Wine the Flick?! — Pitch Perfect 3

“Pitch Perfect 3” is the Barton Bellas’ swan song. Not that we needed three of these movies — the first one was a blast, and it’s been a matter of diminishing returns ever since — but nevertheless, here we are. And I couldn’t imagine a better person to aca-analyze this movie with me than my dear friend Kearran Giovanni, star of the TNT series “Major Crimes” and a Broadway musical veteran. Kearran liked the movie better than I did, but I’ll jump at any opportunity to get together over wine with my talented (and extremely busy) friend. Please enjoy our conversation from the TCL Chinese Theatre in Hollywood.

Post Date Dec 15

RogerEbert.com — The Leisure Seeker

It’s hard to imagine that legendary actors like Helen Mirren and Donald Sutherland could co-star in a movie that’s flat-out terrible but … they have. And it’s called “The Leisure Seeker.” That’s also the affectionate name of their clunky RV, which they take on one last road trip. Director Paolo Virzi’s film is meant to be equal parts wacky and poignant. It is neither. My RogerEbert.com review.

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Post Date Dec 7

RogerEbert.com — I, Tonya

As a (wannabe) figure skater, I was already predisposed to liking “I, Tonya.” But I was blown away by how surprisingly powerful and poignant it was. It’s “GoodFellas” on ice: darkly comic and often just plain dark, but always breathtakingly alive. Margot Robbie is heartbreaking as the disgraced skater and Allison Janney just tears it up as her abusive mother. My rave, at RogerEbert.com.

Read the review here

Post Date Dec 1

RogerEbert.com — Voyeur

Gerald Foos bought a motel in Colorado to spy on his guests having sex with each other. And his story only gets weirder from there. My RogerEbert.com review of the documentary “Voyeur,” which has a lot to say about privacy, journalism and the elusive nature of truth.

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Post Date Nov 20

RogerEbert.com — Call Me By Your Name

Luca Guadagnino’s “Call Me By Your Name” is the best film of 2017. This story of unexpected first love set in northern Italy during the summer of 1983 is lushly beautiful and achingly sad, with pitch-perfect performances from Timothee Chalamet and Armie Hammer. It left me a sobbing mess. Come swoon with me at RogerEbert.com. It’s my first four-star review of the year.

Read the review here

Post Date Nov 17

RogerEbert.com — Wonder

What a wonderful surprise this movie is. It looks like a mawkish family drama about a young boy who overcomes a genetic abnormality and finds some happiness in the world. But it ends up being genuinely moving, thanks to strong performances from Jacob Tremblay, Julia Roberts and Owen Wilson and (mostly) understated direction from Stephen Chbosky. You’ll shed a few tears — especially if you’re a parent — and they’ll be earned. My RogerEbert.com review.

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Post Date Nov 10

RogerEbert.com — Bitch

As director, writer and star, Marianna Palka has come up with a creative, provocative concept with “Bitch”: She plays an overwhelmed, underappreciated wife and mother who snaps one day and starts living life as a dog. But Palka has trouble balancing dark comedy with dire melodrama, struggling to find the right tone as she blend so many wildly different and difficult kinds of movie at once. My RogerEbert.com review.

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Post Date Nov 1

RogerEbert.com — A Bad Moms Christmas

“A Bad Moms Christmas” arrives in theaters just 15 months after last summer’s surprise-hit comedy “Bad Moms,” and it’s as shoddy and slapped-together as it sounds. And I really liked the original, too. But this feels like a waste of some great, veteran talent, including Susan Sarandon and Christine Baranski. Bah humbug, indeed. My RogerEbert.com review.

Read the review here